Life In Post-Katrina New Orleans

[Longtime reader Candice took me up on my offer to give us a glance into post-Katrina New Orleans. It's a great read.]

I used to call these fragments posts.

So, life in New Orleans is all I can talk about anyway, so here goes.

Life here is bizarre, we all drink more than normal, and the bars are just about the only places that keep hours like they did before.

Devastation aside, it's had some interesting side effects.

The Times-Picayune does not suck anywhere near as much as it used to. They have someone who can do flash, putting together animations of when exactly everything flooded. They post video and news updates all day long, and collect it all up into print overnight.

We have a city wireless network, which Earthlink is planning to extend, much to the dismay of BellSouth. Screw Bellsouth. Their inaction is causing most of the remaining city to go to cellphones for their daily activities, never to return. I was at UPS in N.O. East, picking up a package a couple of weeks back, and the counter staff was using them for official operations. And lastly…

Dear Tropical Storm Alberto,

Please go hit Florida. We aren't ready for you yet here. We barely have enough water pressure to fight our own fires, and we don't know if the pumps work yet, and we don't need to give anyone else an excuse to write us off.

love,

Candice

[read Candice's blog here]

Explore posts in the same categories: Bellsouth, blogging, candice, candice quates, Earthlink, Florida, Guest Post, Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, Times-Picayune, Tropical Storm Alberto

17 Comments on “Life In Post-Katrina New Orleans”

  1. Robin Scotts Says:

    Nice post Candice. You guys are not forgotten. Char personally is seeing to that!

  2. VampireFeet Says:

    Nice to see you are drinking more Candice. Thank you for keping us informed. I have to go tune up my Farrari.🙂

  3. candice Says:

    Vamp, heh, I’m drinking less than I was in September and October! No time for bars lately – where I just moved I have several in walking distance which I have no time to patronize.

  4. Scrivs Says:

    Great entry except the please go hit Florida part. Nobody wants any natural disaster to come their way so why can’t we just pray that every storm dies in the Gulf or at least just hovers above Bush’s ranch in Texas.

  5. candice Says:

    Scrivs – that’s where the weather service says it is going – and in normal times, a tropical storm like this is really minor, it’s just rain. I just don’t think we could handle a 10 inch rain right now without serious problems, sadly.

  6. TerryC Says:

    I would like to know why you decided to stay in New Orleans? What’s the job situation? And how is the city different? Is it better? No offense, but the reputation of New Orleans sucks.

  7. Mark Says:

    You know Candice, I used to discount tropical storms too, that is before TS Allison pretty much brought the city of Houston to its knees in 2001.

    I’d have to go with Paul (Scrivs) on this one. Lets hope it fades out in the gulf, or at the most brings the rain that Florida needs, and not much else.

  8. candice Says:

    Terryc, how does the reputation of New Orleans suck?

    I stayed because it’s my home, and because I can. That’s it. So many people are not as fortunate as I’ve been throughout this whole thing, and to leave would be to spit in the faces of the people working so hard to come back, when I’m actually doing pretty well.


  9. I feel sorry for the New Orleans people who are being taken advantage of. This area is a disaster ready to happen again. The Army Corps of Engineers did a lousy job on the levvies, as they admit. Incompetence strikes again.

    New super storms will ravage the Gulf Coast. You have to be nuts to live there.

  10. chartreuse Says:

    The United States is getting to the point where you can pretty much work from anywhere. That means you can live you want. New Orleans was one of the most unique cities in the world. I miss it.

  11. michele Says:

    It is tragic what has and is happening in the South. Not only New Orleans but also the neighbors who don’t get the press coverage. But please don’t wish a hurricane on Florida. No one needs this trauma/drama, send a prayer to have it disolve. Don’t send it to another state.

  12. acab Says:

    “Screw Bellsouth. Their inaction is causing most of the remaining city to go to cellphones for their daily activities, never to return.”

    Not that I’m one to defend BellSouth, but this is simply retarded. New Orleans lost 13 central offices during Katrina. There is fault tolerance built into the system, but nowhere near the point where any telephone network built by anyone can sustain that type of infrastructure damage. Furthermore, all the phone lines have been wrecked by the flooding. It takes time to lay all that cable down, contruct the new central offices, and wire everything together (especially when you have to import all the workers from other places in the country because there’s nobody in New Orleans to do the work). BellSouth said from day one that it would take about 3-5 years to get everything back to normal (actually better than normal, there’s much more fiber being laid down).

  13. candice Says:

    Bellsouth? I have no sympathy for them at this point. It’s been months, if the cable and power companies can do it, so can bellsouth. They take forever on everything for people in areas that did not even flood. It takes weeks to get a phone line UPTOWN. (And it’s taking me goddamn forever to get a T1 to the northshore, but I digress.)

    Who is going to be using the landlines for phones in five years?

  14. chartreuse Says:

    5 years?!?!
    The company should have just haddened customers Cell Phones. That would have been cool…

  15. candice Says:

    Actually chartreuse, the major cell phone carriers were giving out cellphones to anyone with a FEMA number, with “three months” of prepaid time on them. That was pretty neat.

  16. acab Says:

    “Bellsouth? I have no sympathy for them at this point. It’s been months, if the cable and power companies can do it, so can bellsouth. They take forever on everything for people in areas that did not even flood. It takes weeks to get a phone line UPTOWN. (And it’s taking me goddamn forever to get a T1 to the northshore, but I digress.)

    Who is going to be using the landlines for phones in five years? ”

    Landlines are going to be in use for a long time. Landlines are what connect the cell sites to the regular network infrastructure, so while your regular consumer will be using cell phones, those cell phones still need a way to talk to the rest of the network.

    Furthermore, there’s just not enough people to do the work and restoring infrastructure is probably a lot more important than making sure someone uptown can get a line in a timely manner.

  17. sandra Says:

    There are after-school and tutoring programs for children, computer and job-training classes for adults, and plans to operate an organic farm, housing and other activities, residents do not receive cash payments.
    ——————
    sandra
    florida drug rehab


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